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The wait for a needed medical treatment has cost$ 2.1 billion to the Canadian

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29 March, 2019 09:30

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One million Canadians have had to wait for a needed medical treatment in 2018, which cost a lot of $ 2.1 billion (G$) in lost wages, reveals a study by theFraser Institute, a think tank on public policy.

“Wait for the necessary medical treatment remains a feature of the canadian health system and, in addition to the pain and the suffering increased, and even the worst medical consequences, these long waits are also Canadians of working hours, time with their family and friends,” says Bacchus Barua, assistant director of studies on health policy at the Fraser Institute and co-author of the report, titled The Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2019.

An average loss of 1 924 $

The study revealed that more than one million patients who had been waiting for a treatment to be medically necessary last year have each lost 1 $ 924 average, because of the loss of salary and loss of productivity during work hours. This amounts to$2.1 billion.

The study relies on the data of the study Waiting Your Turn Fraser Institute, an annual survey of canadian physicians who have recently reported a median wait time of 11 weeks from the appointment of the specialist. It is three weeks longer than what physicians consider clinically reasonable.

A conservative estimate

The loss of$ 2.1 billion in wages is probably a conservative estimate, because it does not take into account the extra waiting of 8.7 weeks before you see a specialist after being referred by a general practitioner. Taken together (11 weeks and 8.7 weeks), the median wait time in Canada for medical treatment was 19.8 weeks in 2018.

“As long as the waiting time define the Canadian health care system, patients continue to pay the price of lost wages and quality of life,” added Mr. Barua.

Last year, residents of Manitoba were faced with the cost of waiting per patient in the highest (2 852 $), followed by the Île-du-Prince-Édouard (2 594 $) and Alberta (2 538 $).

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